37° Flared Fitting

Assembly Instructions

Recommended
  1. Inspect for possible contamination or damage from shipping or handling. Sealing surface should be smooth. Annular tool marks of (100uin) concentric with thread permissible.
  2. Lubricate the threads and the entire surface of the cone with hydraulic fluid or a light lubricant.
  3. Align mating components for hand connection and turn flare nut until sealing surfaces make full contact.
  4. Torque nut to the values shown on the following table. If a wrench pad is provided next to nut, place a second wrench on pad to prevent flare from rotating while being torqued.
  5. When torquing nut onto a straight flared fitting, it may be necessary to also place a wrench on the flared fitting wrench pad to prevent it from turning during assembly.

Dash Size
Flared Thread Size
4 TO 1 Minimum Burst PSI
-2
5/16-24
6-7
-3
3/8-24
6-9
-4
7/16-20
9-12
-5
1/2-20
14-15
-6
9/16-18
18-20
-8
3/4-16
27-39
-10
7/8-14
36-63
-12
1 1/16-12
65-88

-14

1 3/16-12
75-103
-16
1 5/16-12
85-113
-20
1 5/8-12
115-133
-24
1 7/8-12
125-167
-32
2 1/2-12
190-258



Alternate Assembly Method
  1. If torque method not possible, follow steps 1-3 above, then proceed to the steps below.
  2. Lightly wrench tighten the nut until there is firm resistance.
  3. Place a wrench on wrench pad next to nut as near the 6 O’clock position as possible
  4. Place second wrench on nut as near the 3 O’clock position as possible.
  5. Turn nut clockwise to no less than the 4 O’clock position and no more than the 6 O’clock position. Required rotation generally decreases as size increases.
Why Wet Torque?

Due to the difference in plating types and thickness, materials, and thread quality of different components, the coefficient of friction varies greatly on any given assembly. Lubrication not only produces a more consistent coefficient of friction, it increases clamping force on sealing area with less torque on the threads. Overtightening causes threads to yield, deform and lose their ability to maintain an adequate load or clamping force on the seating area. Extended operation and severe conditions cause further yielding which results in leaks. Overtightening is the single greatest cause for leaks in metal to metal seat hydraulic connections. It is our firm position, that to not wet torque, is to compromise consistency and quality for convenience.